Faraday Cage vs Faraday Bag:


Which One Is For You?

Updated 01/29/2020


Have you wondered about simple ways to optimize your operational security?


Have you heard of something called a 'Faraday Bag'?


Ever wonder what they are for or how they are different from Faraday cages?


You're in luck because in this article, we will cover:

  • History of the Faraday Cage
  • Purpose of a Faraday Bag
  • Difference between Faraday Cage and Bag
  • What to put in a Faraday Bag
  • What to put in a Faraday Cage
  • History of the Faraday Cage
  • Purpose of a Faraday Bag
  • Difference between Faraday Cage and Bag
  • What to put in a Faraday Bag
  • What to put in a Faraday Cage
Have you wondered about simple ways to optimize your operational security?

Have you heard of something called a 'Faraday Bag'?Ever wonder what they are for?

You're in luck because in this article, we will cover:


  • History of the Faraday Cage
  • Purpose of a Faraday Bag
  • Difference between Faraday Cage and Bag
  • What to put in a Faraday Bag
  • What to put in a Faraday Cage

History of the Faraday Cage

The Faraday Cage was first conceptualized by Michael Farady in 1836 and previously observed in the documented experiments by Benjamin Franklyn and Jean-Antoine Nollet a century before.

Faraday cages and Faraday bags are some of the most effective and affordable ways to create protection from radio frequencies. 

Since their discovery, Faraday cages have been used is various places ranging from chemistry labs where precise and sensitive measurements are required, to US Military and NATO computer centres where any unwanted radio emission must be blocked for security and equipment precision considerations. 

The popularity of these EM (electro-magnetic) and RF (radio frequency) shields is so great that they spawned the “tin foil” internet meme.
You can even see them play an important role in the plot development of “Breaking Bad” prequel Better Call Saul.

Saul Goodman’s older brother Chuck McFill suffers from a rare condition which makes him vulnerable to radio waves, so he covers his house in tin foil and avoids using any electronic devices.
Saul Goodman shocked to see his brother, Chuck, plaster the house in tinfoil to repel electro-magentism
However, Faraday cages are impractical for personal use and may be a little too elaborate for particular everyday needs.

Somebody who simply wants to secure a mobile phone, internet connection, or computer by blocking radio frequencies can simply make use of a Faraday bag.

For this small-scale purpose you don’t have to shield the entire room, building, or environment to isolate individual devices – it’s enough to just purchase an affordable Faraday bag or build your own by alternating layers of plastic and aluminium. 

When Should You Use A Faraday Bag

Ultimately, the answer comes down to the scale of your signal-blocking operations and your expectations for portability.

If you want to protect your mobile phone or bluetooth-capable devices from external attacks and you’re traveling or on the run, it’s simply better to get a Faraday bag.

On the other hand, if you want to isolate an entire room or building from radio frequencies, bluetooth intrusions, and unwanted WiFi signals, it’s a lot better to make use of Faraday cages. 
Ultimately, the answer comes down to the scale of your signal-blocking operations and your expectations for portability.

If you want to protect your mobile phone or bluetooth-capable devices from external attacks and you’re traveling or on the run, it’s simply better to get a Faraday bag.
On the other hand, if you want to isolate an entire room or building from radio frequencies, bluetooth intrusions, and unwanted WiFi signals, it’s a lot better to make use of Faraday cages.

Interestingly, thick metal thrash cans in which you insert a plastic bags can be excellent Faraday cages for your mobile phone, tablet, hardware wallet, or laptop.

However, they are not very portable and walking around with them will definitely raise suspicions.

Therefore, if you simply need to isolate small devices, then it’s definitely better for operation security (op-sec) to carry a Faraday bag in your pocket, suitcase, or backpack.

At the end of the day, the distinction is very simple: Faraday cages are for open spaces where you use devices that require no mobility.

These devices might include:
  • internet routers
  • desktop computers
  • chunky laptops that you never carry with you
  • What to put in a Faraday Bag
  • What to put in a Faraday Cage
While Faraday bags are for securing your mobile phone, car key fobs, and items like bitcoin hardware wallets on the go.

Certainly, you can also use a Faraday bag in your house if you want to avoid redecorating the walls or raising suspicions about your mental sanity whenever someone visits you.

Faraday Bags vs Mylar Bags

Mylar bags are very popular solutions to store food on the long term.

The fact that they have Aluminium foil on the inside means that your vegetables will stay fresh in the fridge for an extended period of time.

However, they are not considered to be efficient against RFID (radio frequency identification), bluetooth, or WiFi signals.
Mylar bags are very popular solutions to store food on the long term.

The fact that they have Aluminium foil on the inside means that your vegetables will stay fresh in the fridge for an extended period of time.
 
However, they are not considered to be efficient against RFID (radio frequency identification), bluetooth, or WiFi signals.

In comparison, Mylar bags are thinner than Faraday bags – the former have a thin and minimal Aluminium foil, while the latter is built from a thick layer which alternates plastic and Aluminium.

Certainly, you can stack multiple Mylar bags in order to achieve results that are similar with those you get with Faraday bags.

A popular Reddit post has examined the issue only to discover that two Mylar bags are not enough to block AM radio signal

In conclusion, if you are truly concerned about the security of your electronic devices and want to block remote attacks, it’s definitely better to not compromise on layers of plastic and aluminium by opting for a Faraday bag.   

What Should I Store In A Faraday Bag?

There is no finite answer to this question.

Ultimately, it comes down to any item that can be remotely hacked and that you would prefer it not to be.

The following list gives common items one might store in Faraday bag.
There is no finite answer to this question.

Ultimately, it comes down to any item that can be remotely hacked and that you would prefer it not to be.
The following list gives common items one might store in Faraday bag.
  • Mobile phones
  • laptops
  • Bitcoin hardware wallets
  • car key remotes
  • credit cards
  • credit cards
  • passports
  • smart watches
  • tablets
  • building access cards
Mobile phones and tablets are easy to attack via bluetooth or WiFi.

Credit cards can be used to spend money via contactless payments by placing a scanner close to your wallet.

Furthermore, the radio which unlocks your car can be remotely intercepted and replicated to cause you damages. 

The bitcoins you keep in a hardware wallet aren’t absolutely safe from remote attacks either.

During his December 2018 presentation from the 35C3 conference, Josh Datko of the wallet.fail team has demonstrated how he was able to send attacks to Trezor and Ledger hardware wallets.

In the event of supply chain attacks where an extra RFID antenna is placed in your hardware wallet, it becomes very simple to remotely control your device and send coins to arbitrary addresses.

Accordingly, it’s definitely better to keep your hardware wallet in a Faraday cage if you want to be 100% sure that nobody can attempt to remotely hack your device.  

If you’re targeted by governments or elaborate hackers, it’s very likely that they will attempt to compromise all of your devices.

Even if you’re a law-abiding citizen, our modern-day surveillance capitalism may find excuses to make this type of backdoor access completely legitimate and possibly mandatory.

In such a scenario, it becomes civil duty to make use of Faraday cages and bags whenever you get the chance, so the attack surface gets limited and you can offer proper protection to your private property. 

Here is yet another argument in favor of Faraday bags: since they are small, portable, and easy to disguise in everyday items such as wallets (or even conceal in your suitcase or backpack), they grant you a degree of plausible deniability.

Nobody will feel suspicious when they see one, and it’s easier to disguise them as common objects. 

And for only $15 for a small Faraday bag or $25 for a large one, the price you pay to protect your precious data and belongings from RFID, bluetooth, and WiFi attacks is extremely small in comparison to more elaborate security setups.

The cost of purchasing rolls of plastic and tin in order to build your own Faraday bag is even smaller, but getting the right kind of result takes some time and experimentation.

And...it won't be nearly as doable. 
When you go to a bank and request to withdraw a large sum of money, it’s likely that the institution will be unable to make the payment on the spot

Instead, they will enforce a daily withdrawal limit on you.

What Should I Store In A Faraday Cage?

Faraday cages are for large objects that you don’t carry around.
Protecting your internet router from hackers outside your house, or making sure that nobody tries to remotely attack your desktop computer are only two of the most popular use cases.

Just keep in mind that military organizations which comply with the Tempest standards make use of Faraday cages to prevent electrical signals and noises from being intercepted.

While you might argue that your data and internet devices aren’t subject to the same precautions as military secrets, it’s also worth considering that your private property is no joking matter and you’re responsible to protect it. 

Often times Faraday boxes are confused with Faraday cages, but the differences can be narrowed down to scale.

The former are smaller and used for safe long-term storage of electronic devices, while the latter refer to larger surfaces that get temporarily or permanently isolated from outside radio frequencies.
A set of Faraday boxes
For more details regarding Faraday cages and their practical use cases, check out the great variety of YouTube videos on the matter.

Not only that they provide thorough explanations, but they sometimes also features complete DIY guides that allow you to build your own Faraday cages. 

If you’re looking for a quick way to secure your devices in a way that is both portable and convenient, then check out our Faraday Bag Bundle.

For $35 you get two military-grade bags that will shield your mobile phones, hardware wallets, tablets, biometric passports, credit cards, access cards, car keys, smart watches, two-way radio devices, and transponders. 

Conclusion

The difference between a Faraday cage and Faraday bag is mostly in the size and portability of the item.

Faraday bags are great for small items that fit in your pocket, while Faraday cages are more used to protect stationary objects or entire rooms of gear.

There are several options for Faraday bags on the market, but we think ours is pretty damn good and it comes in at a great price as well.

Learn more below!
Faraday Bag Bundle

"These bags are every bit as good, if not better than the other Faraday bag companies."


$35

Billfodl Faraday bags prevent all electronics held inside from receiving radio signals, including Wifi, Bluetooth, RFID, GPS, and Infrared (key fobs).

Ideal for:

  • Preventing key fob signal boosting and car theft
  • Blocking mobile apps from tracking your location through GPS
  • Shielding hardware wallets from remote tampering via Bluetooth
  • Halting RFID readers from swiping credit card and passport data

125% Refunds

Ballistic Nylon

Water Resistant

Blocks All Signal

Includes both a small and large bag. Works best with hardware wallets utilizing bluetooth like Ledger nano X, Key Fobs, Mobile phones and tablets.

125% Money Back Guarantee

Ballistic Nylon Material

Water Resistant Enclosure

Blocks Wifi, RFID, Bluetooth

125% Refunds

Ballistic Nylon

Water Resistant

Blocks Radio Frequencies

Free Shipping

All US orders and International orders of $120 or more

Easy Returns

No questions asked - just 125% money back guarantee

Secured Payments

All card payments are secured through Shopify payments

Customer Support

Get free and fast email/chat support with our in-house crypto experts

Features

1050D Ballistic Nylon

Our Faraday bags are made out of water-resistant 1050D Ballistic nylon, known for its intense strength and hardiness, because your electronics should be safe from more than just radio frequencies.

Verification Window

Seeing is believing, which is why our large Faraday bag sports a device preview window to confirm signal cutoff and battery life on all electronic devices inside. Don't trust. Verify.

5th Gen Device Shielding

Blocks WiFi (2.4 & 5GHz), bluetooth, cell signals (4G LTE+), GPS, RFID, and radio signals with 60-80dB average attenuation offer 5th Gen device shielding assurances.

Triple Layered, Dual Paired Seam

Three layers of high-shielding fabric on all sides are sown together with dual paired seam construction, making the bag durable and ready to work in inclement conditions.

Easy Access

The double roll and velcro closure means accessing your electronics is a breeze. Our bags are designed to keep radio frequencies outnot you. 


Additional Info

Summary

  • Military-grade faraday bag designed for law enforcement forensic investigators, also used for executive travel, personal security, EMP and CME protection
  • Shields cell phones, GPS units, electronic toll collection transponders (like E-ZPass), keyfobs, or other similar size devices from ALL wireless signals
  • 5th Gen device shielding assurance
  • EMI shielding & RFI shielding
  • Three layers of high-shielding fabric on all sides with dual paired seam construction
  • Blocks WiFi (2.4 & 5GHz), Bluetooth, cell signals (4G LTE+), GPS, RFID, and radio signals with 60-80dB average attenuation
  • Closable pocket on back to place company/agency information
  • Water-resistant ballistic nylon outer materials
  • Double roll and Velcro closure

Dimensions

Large Bag

Outer dimensions: 9.75" x 9.5" x .1"

Inner usage dimensions: 9.5" x 5.5"

Small Bag

5" x 3.25" x 0.25


Free Shipping

All US orders and International orders of $120 

Easy Returns

No questions asked - just 125% money back guarantee

Secured Payments

All card payments are secured through Shopify payments

Customer Support

Get free and fast email/chat support with our in-house crypto experts


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